Earthquake

ASEAN Disaster Recovery Reference Guide
The ASEAN Disaster Recovery Reference Guide (the Guide) aims to help the ASEAN Member States prepare for recovery; and deliver timely, efficient and effective recovery programmes.
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This study aims to test a methodology for teaching people about the characteristics of each post-disaster phase concerning road infrastructure and business continuity.
2011 Bhutan PDNA
This Joint Rapid Assessment presents an overall assessment of the damage and loss following the 2011 earthquake in Bhutan. A framework for early recovery, reconstruction, and disaster risk reduction is also presented in the latter section of this Assessment.
10 Dec 2021
The Gorkha Earthquake in Nepal occurred on 25 April 2015 and had a magnitude of 7.6. Its epicentre was about 76km northwest of the capital Kathmandu. It was followed by more than 300 aftershocks. Around 9,000 people were killed, of whom approximately 55 per cent were female, and over 100,000 people were injured. Overall eight million people have been impacted, which is almost one-third of the population of Nepal.
10 Dec 2021
The Izmit Earthquake, also called Kocaeli Earthquake or Golcuk Earthquake, occurred on 17 August 1999. The magnitude 7.4 earthquake, which lasted less than a minute, struck the Anatolian fault system with the epicentre at about 7 miles southeast of Izmit. It caused the deaths of 17,000 people and left more than 250,000 people homeless. It was followed by the magnitude 7.2 Duzce Earthquake on 12 November 1999, which also occurred on the North Anatolian Fault and caused at least 845 deaths in Duzce and surrounding areas.
19 Jan 2022
The Japan earthquake and tsunami prompted extensive damage, including the nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
16 Dec 2021
The morning of December 26, 2004 saw the worst disaster in Indonesia’s history. A magnitude (M) 9.1 submarine earthquake occurred along the Indian Ocean subduction zone triggering a massive tsunami that destroyed 800 km of the coastal areas of Aceh Province with inundation observed as far as 6 km inland. Post disaster damage and loss assessment revealed staggering numbers on the calamity that include over 220,000 human fatalities and the destruction of 139,000 houses, 73,869 hectares of agricultural lands, 2,618 kilometers of roads, 3,415 schools, 104,500 small-medium enterprises, 13,828 fishing boats, 119 bridges, 669 government buildings, 517 health facilities, 1,089 worship places, 22 seaports, and 8 airports and airstrips (BRR-Agency for the Rehabilitation and Reconstruction of Aceh and Nias, 2009). Added to these statistics, more than half a million tsunami survivors were internally displaced and hundreds of thousands more lost their livelihoods.
Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Report of the 10-Year Reconstruction Overall Verification and Recommendation.jpg
This report is a comprehensive verification of the efforts made for reconstruction from the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake over the last decade in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, and provides recommendations for similar future shocks.
GHAE Establishment of Specialized Course on Disaster Mitigation -EN.png
This document introduces the case study about reconstruction from Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in Kobe city, Hyogo prefecture. (Disaster Mitigation Education)
GHAE Realizing Development of Town Centering Around Rokkomichi Minami Park -EN.png
This document introduces the case study about reconstruction from Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in Kobe city, Hyogo prefecture. (Development of Disaster Management Facilities Integrated in Town Development)